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Presidential Thought Experiment Attempt #2

Let's see if I can word this better this time.

Poll #1202840 Presidential Candidates' Candor

How likely do you think it is that Obama would make a public admission of error, faced with such?

Very likely
10(27.8%)
Somewhat likely
13(36.1%)
I don't know
6(16.7%)
Somewhat unlikely
7(19.4%)
Never
0(0.0%)

How likely do you think it is that McCain would make a public admission of error, faced with such?

Very likely
2(5.6%)
Somewhat likely
5(13.9%)
I don't know
6(16.7%)
Somewhat unlikely
18(50.0%)
Never
5(13.9%)

Comments

( 12 comments — Leave a comment )
weetletang
Jun. 10th, 2008 07:19 pm (UTC)
See, now is when I will complain about how vague the question is.

There are public admissions of errors that I could see both of them not admitting to. So without knowing what specific error we are referencing I can't give much of an opinion above "I think for the most part Obama is MORE likely to admit to an error", which is what I tried to show in my answers.
kirisutogomen
Jun. 10th, 2008 09:23 pm (UTC)
I don't think we have enough data to make a prediction like this for Obama. I certainly don't have enough personally to do so.

OTOH, I'm quite confident that McCain is one of the most likely politicians to admit an error, simply because he has actually done it many times.
crs
Jun. 11th, 2008 09:46 am (UTC)
He has actually done it many times? Can I ask for an example or two?
kirisutogomen
Jun. 11th, 2008 11:56 pm (UTC)
I'm a little surprised that this is necessary, but OK. The first thing that comes up when I Google for "McCain admits error" is McCain admits error on King holiday
kirisutogomen
Jun. 12th, 2008 12:57 am (UTC)
Midway down this transcript of a Meet The Press from a few years ago, the conversation goes
MR. RUSSERT: Let me turn to another ethical, moral, political issue, stem cell research. In 2000, John McCain and 19 other senators wrote a letter which said "Since 1996 Congress has banned federal funding for `research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed.' ...we support [this law]." You've changed your mind.

SEN. McCAIN: Yes, I have.

MR. RUSSERT: Why?

SEN. McCAIN: For a large number of reasons, ranging from getting briefed by very smart people on this issue and including discussing this with Nancy Reagan who, as you know, is a very strong advocate for stem cell research.
crs
Jun. 12th, 2008 03:50 am (UTC)
Excellent examples. Thanks.
navrins
Jun. 10th, 2008 11:37 pm (UTC)
On NPR today, Obama admitted that he previously expected the Lakers to win (whatever series it is they were talking about) handily, but now realizes the Celtics are at least going to make it difficult and maybe win.

Okay, it's an admission of trivial error, but you didn't specify.
vfish
Jun. 11th, 2008 02:16 am (UTC)
Obama's not ashamed to admit error. For instance, look at his gas tax holiday stance: they tried it in Illinois, and it didn't work, so he's opposed to trying it again. As a scientist, that sort of logic resonates with me.

McCain is all over the map on his policies. He was against torture before he was for it. Sunni, Shia -- he can't keep them straight, nor does he need to, because he knows who the terrorists are in his gut, or is that just indigestion? (Damn campaign handlers, I told them I couldn't handle Mexican food! or dairy, or anything crunchy, or ....) Hillary did a great job and, no wait, she didn't, because to say so would piss off my Republican base, and they don't really like me to begin with. What is this "U Tube" of which you speak? He can't even find consistency between what he says and what's on his website. He'll never have to admit an error, because if McCain 2.0 is wrong, McCain 1.0 held the opposite position, or is it McCain 3.0?
crs
Jun. 11th, 2008 09:45 am (UTC)
Is this sarcasm, or serious? I can't quite tell. Praising one candidate for changing his mind, then accusing the other one for inconsistency when he changes his mind, is not going to win any arguments, I don't think...

The Sunni/Shia thing is disturbing, though, to be sure. It's not so much that he doesn't correct himself - he does, on the occasions when Lieberman is there to whisper in his ear - it's that, to him, the distinction doesn't seem important enough to get right once he's made the mistake twice in the same weekend. Is he still getting that wrong?

I never noticed when he didn't recognize "U Tube" but if that's true, he's at least claiming to learn.

In any case, as much as I admire Obama for being against a gas tax holiday, I can't really give him credit for that as "admitting error" since I don't think he's framed it as a shift in his own policies.

Maybe I'm being too strict, or maybe I believe that somewhere in his history there is a more bonafide example that I'd like to dig up and be able to point at - something to help me explain my gut feeling to the "I don't know" votes in Obama's column. I don't know why, but this example doesn't cut it for me.
vfish
Jun. 11th, 2008 12:58 pm (UTC)
Sarcasm or serious? A little from column A, a little from column B.

There's a huge difference between changing one's mind because you've acquired evidence that you were wrong in the first place and doing so for political expediency. The gas tax thing for Obama qualifies as the former: he was for the idea, tried it out, found out it didn't work, and subsequently opposed future implementation of the same idea. He got hammered for that stance by Clinton and McCain. The politically expedient (and intellectually dishonest) thing to do would have been to be for a gas tax holiday this year, since neither of his competitors would have had the ability to go after him on the issue.

It's hard to come up with better examples for Obama because he doesn't have that long a legislative record, he's been intellectually consistent, and he's been on the right side of most issues. What, is he now going to be for lead paint, weapons proliferation, and secrecy in government?
abce
Jun. 13th, 2008 12:14 am (UTC)
so your poll reveals the bias on your flist, and that the Obamaites are more extreme than McCain's followers
crs
Jun. 13th, 2008 01:59 am (UTC)
It was always supposed to be a poll about perception.
( 12 comments — Leave a comment )