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Votetacular

I didn't think to look at my number when I voted. I'll have to track down the cute girl who was like 5 in front of me in line, ask her what her number was, and then add 5. Or so.

Remember - don't vote for "change we can believe in." Vote for "change in which we can believe."

Comments

( 7 comments — Leave a comment )
shaggy_man
Nov. 4th, 2008 07:03 pm (UTC)
I didn't get a number from the antiquated lever-pull voting machine this morning.

But I was first in line when the polling place opened, so I guess I was #1.
yakshaver
Nov. 4th, 2008 07:19 pm (UTC)
That's funny, there was a really cute girl about five in front of me too. Presumably not the same one....

I was #965 at Ciampa Manner.
gospog
Nov. 4th, 2008 07:25 pm (UTC)
" I'll have to track down the cute girl who was like 5 in front of me in line, ask her what her number..."

I think the rest of this sentence may be unnescessary. ;)

zkzkz
Nov. 4th, 2008 07:52 pm (UTC)
Why? What have you got against final prepositions anyways?
crs
Nov. 4th, 2008 07:55 pm (UTC)
That one famous guy said they were a thing up with which he would not put. So I figure he must be onto something.
zkzkz
Nov. 4th, 2008 08:50 pm (UTC)
I think you may be missing the British sarcasm
zkzkz
Nov. 4th, 2008 09:02 pm (UTC)
The standard form of this anecdote goes something like:

After an overzealous editor attempted to rearrange one of Winston Churchill's sentences to avoid ending it in a preposition, the Prime Minister scribbled a single sentence in reply: "This is the sort of bloody nonsense up with which I will not put."

As it happens this is almost certainly misattributed as the earliest forms of this anecdote do not involve Churchill at all. (see http://158.130.17.5/~myl/languagelog/archives/001715.html)

And furthermore, this sentence isn't actually a good example of silly a rule it is as it cheats, moving *two* prepositions including one which has no object and is arguably an adverb (see http://158.130.17.5/~myl/languagelog/archives/001702.html)
( 7 comments — Leave a comment )